How to improve your accuracy with the FNX

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Thread: How to improve your accuracy with the FNX

  1. #1
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    How to improve your accuracy with the FNX

    And any handgun actually.

    Bottom line, the FNX is usually a better shot than you are. If you are having some problems hitting the target, or having a decent sized group, follow these simple steps first. Then and only then will you know for sure if it is you or your gun that is the problem.

    Watch this video first.



    If you are having difficulty seeing your target as you shoot, You're using your sights wrong. In fact, I bet that most people who are new to shooting are.

    The 3 dots are not for target shooting. they are for rapid target acquisition in a close range combat scenario. You line them up, and the center dot is point of aim.

    When you are shooting for accuracy, forget the dots. You don't need them. Line up the top edge of the front and back sights so they are on the same plane. Then ensure the front sight has equal space on the left and right between the rear sights. The top center edge of the front blade is now your aim point. You should be able to see the top half of whatever you're aiming at.

    A few other important shooting fundamentals should also be practiced as well. The first one is trigger pull. Most people who shoot poorly will do one of two things wrong, and the first is usually trigger pull. You hear on the movies to squeeze the trigger rather than pull it. but that is over simplifying things. The idea is to pull the trigger in such a smooth and continuous motion that you the shooter are surprised by the timing of the shot. use the tip of your finger, and not the knuckle, so that you cannot change the orientation of the muzzle if you jerk the trigger back a little. Try to pull fast and smooth, not quick and jerky. You should not know the exact moment the round will fire, that way you do not flinch before the round leaves the barrel.

    The other problem new shooters have is the actual flinching. You get nervous when you feel the round is about to go off and you try to counter the muzzle flip by pushing down and forward. This causes you to shoot way low. You can train yourself to not do it but first realizing what you're doing. Have a friend put a few dummy rounds randomly into your magazine, and when you get to that shot, either you will not move at all, or your gun will drop forward, and you will see what you're doing.

    Trigger pull: Place your finger tip, the pad of your pointing finger, on the trigger. Pull the trigger straight back at an even consistent rate. Do not jerk the trigger. As mentioned before, the moment the weapon fires should be something of a surprise to you.

    Proper and consistent grip: Every time you pick the gun up, you should be holding it the exact same way as the last time you held it. put the webbing of your dominant hand as far up the grip as comfortably possible. then gently wrap your fingers around so they are in a secure position where they won't slip. Support that hand with your off hand wrapping the off hand fingers over the others fingers. Your off hand finger tips should be right about where your main hand's knuckles are. your off hand thumb should be aligned with the frame. Do not touch the slide and do not cross your thumbs, or wrap your off hand thumb behind the gun (that's where the slide is supposed to go).

    Off hand tension: If you tighten your off hand grip, and press the gun forward holding the sights on target, the front sight blade will become more steady. It will also help to reduce the effects of a hasty or sloppy trigger pull.

    Removing the Slack: Many standard triggers on weapons designed for on-duty carry will have something known as slack. This is the trigger travel that does absolutely nothing in terms of preparing the gun to fire, or actually firing the gun. it is built in as a safety feature for those of us that don't know hoe to keep our finger out of the trigger guard prior to firing. Guns such as the FNX, Glocks, XDs, and M&Ps have this slack. a 1911 might not have this slack depending on the builder and the quality. It is a good idea to remove the slack from the trigger prior to your final trigger pull. You can do this while dry firing at home. Ensure the weapon is unloaded, and point it in a safe direction. pull the trigger back until you feel a sharp increase in resistance. The slack is now removed. You may now aim, and continue firing. This helps reduce the amount of time you must hold your pistol on target before it fires while still surprising you.

    Stance: Square your shoulders to the target. Do not stand cockeyed with one arm bent and the other straight. They should both be extended equally. Lean forward, put your leading foot forward and your other foot off to one side. This will line your body up with the target naturally.

    #1 most important thing. Focus: Once you know what you're shooting at, you don't need to focus on it anymore. Focus instead on the front sight. This will improve your accuracy considerably. If you're about to get into a shooting, and you have any time whatsoever to mentally prepare yourself, the first thing you should tell yourself is "Focus on the front sight". Keep repeating it to yourself over and over.

    Elbows vs. Limp wristing: instead of absorbing the recoil with your wrists, bend your elbows slightly and rotate them out a bit, and absorb the recoil with your elbows. It is a steadier shooting platform, plus it makes recoil more comfortable. It will also reduce malfunction probability due to limp-wristing.

    Bullet drop: In most situations, you won't need to worry about this, but when shooting smaller things at varying distances, you should account for bullet drop. Close in, the round will hit below your sights. At around 15-25 yards, they should hit right on to slightly above the sights. After 30 yards, the bullet drops at an increasing rate, so you must aim higher.

    Practice: And when I say practice, I mean a lot. Dry fire at home, look up some dry firing drills. Practice each fundamental on this page and recap it over and over. When you go out shooting, do not rush yourself. Take the time to focus on accuracy at first. Then slowly speed yourself up over time. The more you practice doing it perfectly, the speed will come automatically. It's just like any other task, do it right every time, and you'll eventually be fast at it too.

    There are a lot of other fundamentals one should learn as they advance as a shooter, but those are the first ones you should practice as you start learning to shoot your pistol.

    Here's a view of several sight pictures.



    Some old school shooters will tell you to use #1, but most pistols aren't sighted that way. The idea is that the bullets rise above the sight and are thrown into the target. This leaves too much room for error for me though.

    #2 is actually the proper way to shoot targets with. The center edge of the front sight is the aim point.

    #3 is a combat dot sight picture, which is perfectly fine as long as the target is bigger than the sights. The front dot is the aim point.

    Bottom line with these sight pictures, If you choose to use #2 and #3, as I suspect most people will, you should practice with both of them as often as you can. They both have their place both in target shooting, and in a real life gun fight.

    Another thing you should also practice is point shooting. I read somewhere that around 80% of people having been in a gun fight never remember even seeing their sights. This little tutorial is just on the basics though, so I won't go over point shooting with you here. But good luck to everyone.

    Here's me demonstrating these techniques in a video.
    Last edited by jhs27275; 02-10-2014 at 12:09 PM.


  2. #2
    Senior Member Knightewolfe's Avatar
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    Thanks for the info.

    I'll use it next time I go to the range with my FNP/ Sight picture for the FNP same as the FNX?

    KW
    FNP40 USG

    Either shoot with the Big Dawgs or stay away from the range. FN Leads the Way!

    Keeping it on target.

  3. #3
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    goes for any pistol pretty much, unless you specifically know you're supposed to use sight pic 1 with yours. Mostly single action revolvers....

    Last edited by jathtech; 02-19-2013 at 12:13 AM.
    cdb45 thanked this.

  4. #4
    Senior Member ImmoralCase's Avatar
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    Lots of good info, now I just need to come back to this thread in six weeks before I head to the range.

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    Junior Member Milkboot's Avatar
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    Always good to get back to the basics

  6. #6
    Member JohnnyLoco's Avatar
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    Here you go

    wheel.jpg
    John 5:24

  7. #7
    Senior Member Bullseye Shooter Cylon Jacker 5.7's Avatar
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    This is a good thread. I didn't realize some of this stuff, and I was qualified expert in the USMC.
    Thumbs up.

  8. #8
    Member Hits The Target jadda7480's Avatar
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    good write up. thanks

  9. #9
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    Just in case you may have missed it, your sight picture for a FNX is #3 combat sights.
    zuidoo thanked this.
    2 x Marlin 795
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  10. #10
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    What part of the finger is suggested to be on the trigger? First pad? Or behind the first knuckle? Because according to that target wheel a couple posts up I either have wrong finger placement or I'm jerking.

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